January 20th statement

If Donald Trump has done one good thing, it’s that he’s brought us together today. Mobilizations like today’s are happening across the state and across the country–gatherings of people who terrified for themselves and their families, infuriated at the state of things, and determined to stand up and resist.

We all know it’s going to be a rough four years. It’s not clear how serious our future president is about his policies of exclusion and ethnic cleansing, but the fascist movement that has brought him to power certainly is. Trump’s base is composed of the most reactionary, backwards elements of the white middle and working classes. Some say we should feel empathy for them: their standard of living has been declining. They are suffering under neoliberalism. But does that absolve them of their votes, votes that they knew would harm people of color, women, and the LGBTQ community? Absolutely not.

It is important to remember that most of the white working class didn’t support Trump, because they didn’t support anyone. Even in a contentious election like this, voter turnout was at an all-time low. But for those who do support Trump, there will be no conciliation. We will not negotiate with them. We will not try to reason with them. Now is not a time for “understanding” or “coming together.” Now is a time for militant opposition.

But who will join us in this opposition? Certainly not the Democrats. Historically, they have been no friend to the oppressed. Under Bill Clinton, we saw the rise of mass incarceration and the evisceration of welfare. Under Obama, we’ve seen the consolidation of the mass surveillance state—a development Trump will certainly enjoy— a continuous state of war and the bombings of seven separate countries. While uprisings shook Baltimore and Ferguson, Obama stayed silent on issues of police violence and racial justice. The Democrats offer nothing essentially different from Trump: repression at home, imperial war and expansion abroad.

Even now, we see the Democrats circling the wagons around the CIA and fomenting xenophobic, anti-Russian hysteria. What we’re seeing here is a struggle between two segments of the ruling class. In the fight between liberal and conservative, or in this case liberal and fascist, we do not have a voice.

The liberal wants a kinder, more subtle form of oppression. Keep the massive prison population, but maybe give them some GED programs. Keep the white supremacist institution of the police, but maybe give them some body-cams. Keep the obscene divide between rich and poor, but maybe make the rich pay a little more to the government. The liberals and the Democrats simply want to make the system seem a little less nightmarish to the people it oppresses.

We, as radicals, reject that logic. We want no prisons, no pigs, and no poverty. We are not just opposed to Trump. We are opposed to the entire white supremacist, capitalist order that gave birth to him. No one in power represents our demands. The entire government is set up to oppose those demands. Appealing to power—whether to Hillary Clinton or Levar Stoney—gets us nothing.

The only solution is to build working-class power from the ground up. Mobilizations like the one today allow us to feel that power, if only for a day. Our goal is to sustain the energy of today’s mobilization, and to build a counter-culture that actually resists. In the coming years, we seek to do more than simply react to Trump’s provocation. We seek to challenge the entire white supremacist, patriarchal capitalist system that he represents.