Lines on the Left

The dominant conception of “politics” is of something civil, devoid of violence. We propose the opposite: real politics are inherently violent. This violence is required to either enforce social relations under capitalism or to destroy those relations. This fact is inseparable from the question of the state.

 

The Left is commonly understood as a homogeneous grouping that stands for ideas of “progress,” but there are crucial political and ideological divisions within it. These divisions emerge from the following questions:

1) What is “politics”?

2) What is the conception of the state and its agents (police, etc.)? And how does this question express the antagonistic opposition between our group— based in working class politics— and liberal groups—based in middle/ruling class politics, albeit sometimes with a “Marxist” or “anarchist” veneer?

The dominant conception of “politics” is of something civil, devoid of violence. We propose the opposite: real politics are inherently violent. This violence is required to either enforce social relations under capitalism or to destroy those relations. This fact is inseparable from the question of the state.

We recognize that the state is the instrument of organized violence by the ruling class, or the bourgeoisie, against the working class for the purpose of maintaining and reproducing capitalist social relations, meaning the continued realization of profit. The police serve to coerce poor and working class people into conforming to the capitalist system.

The liberal conception incorrectly views the state as an arbiter between social classes, and does not view class society as an inherently violent system. With this understanding of social relations under capitalist society, liberals view the police as a neutral organization which maintains peace and order. But we stand on the side of the working class, of the oppressed, of the imprisoned— and that is why we chant Fuck the Police.

Likewise, we have no basis for unity with “communists” or “anarchists” who work to reproduce the structures of capitalist domination over the workers and the poor. They are collaborators who get paid for their services to union and non-profit bureaucracies, which mollify the rage and rebellion of working people. To take a revolutionary position is not to utter meaningless rhetoric about socialism or revolution, but to build autonomous working class organization against the state through resistance and combat. Unions and non-profits are the primary obstacle to the formation of such organization in this country today. Working with and apologizing for such systems of pacification is serving counter- revolutionary purposes.

We have zero trust in any agent of the state— cops, social workers, union bureaucrats, or non-profit staffers. The working class, or proletariat, is the revolutionary class under capitalism. Its class interest is rooted in the elimination of class society. As a social class, it does not wish to be exploited. Its inherent drive is to struggle to end its own exploitation, which cannot be accomplished without the destruction of the state which enforces such exploitation.

Any group that doesn’t share our understanding poses a security risk to our members. Consciously or unconsciously, they are collaborating with the state and its agents. This sort of collaboration is a very real way in which these abstract ideological differences translate into concrete and specific practices.